Selecting Deer Hunting Ammunition for Military Surplus Rifles

Many of today’s most time-honored meat-getters in Mississippi are military surplus rifles. There have been mountains of racks taken by Magnolia state marksman with old British Enfields , 7.62×39 ammo for sale German Mausers and Russian Mosins to name a few. However, with these old warriors, proper ammunition selection is key to harvesting a white tail successfully.

Surplus Ammunition for Surplus Rifles

So you have a beloved old military rifle-great! It was designed to consume full metal jacketed, corrosively primed ammunition and burb out hot lead in a hostile battlefield environment. These rounds, manufactured and stockpiled for the next Great War, are available for the cheap as military surplus. All one has to do is pick up a Shotgun News or J&G catalog and you can find cases (not boxes) of Comm-bloc 7.62x54R for $80 still in the spam can along with any other popular former military ammo you can think of. It is cheap, it is plentiful, and if you are expecting zombie hordes or want a 9-pound plinker rifle then buy it then shoot it. Stockpile it like the dictator of a third world country waiting for a revolution.

But don’t take it in the woods!

This stuff will over penetrate unless you hit hard bone. It was designed to travel out to a kilometer semi-accurately, and be able to provide indirect suppressive fire twice as far. It was meant for firing into sandbags and timbers used in front of defensive positions and still have enough energy to keep a steel-helmeted foot solider pinned down. These rounds are hard and will zip right through a soft-bodied animal like a white-tailed deer. Yes, it will create a wound cavity and more than likely take the animal down, but only after they have run a quarter mile away and hidden in the brush.

In addition, old military ammunition, especially from third world countries, is notoriously funny about making ragged groups. Over time these rounds will start to deteriorate, primers and propellant can age, and decay, making one handful of rounds fire this way, the next handful to fire that way and so forth. Use of these old ammos can also create large amounts of pitting and rust in your rifle if not cleaned immediately after shooting due to the corrosive military primers and powders they are made with.

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